Do we need a flavored condom? I don’t think so

I was skimming through the New York Times and one of their articles talked about condoms. Besides the shocking lack of men who use them, and his history with the product one line in his article stunned me.
“I also know (I mean, my job has required me to learn) a lot about condoms. For instance, for a 2013 article about efforts to craft more pleasurable condoms, I had to collect glow-in-the-dark condoms, piña colada-flavored condoms and vibrating condom rings” (NYT, 2017.” I’ll bold the text that should be noted again.
“I also know (I mean, my job has required me to learn) a lot about condoms. For instance, for a 2013 article about efforts to craft more pleasurable condoms, I had to collect glow-in-the-dark condoms, piña colada-flavored condoms and vibrating condom rings.
Why would anyone want a piña colada-flavored condom. The only way you’de know about the flavor is if you took a bite. Need I say more? That is all.

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science debunks the theory of race

Science has debunked a theory that people have when it comes to race.
For years the pervading statement was that the only difference between the “races” is skin color.
This isn’t true according to Dr. Sarah A. Tishkoff, a geneticist at the University of Pennsylvania, and her team.
The team posted their findings in the Journal Science. The NYT explains the findings:
The researchers pinpointed eight genetic variants in four narrow regions of the human genome that strongly influence pigmentation some making skin darker, and others making it lighter.

These genes are shared across the globe, it turns out; one of them, for example, lightens skin in both Europeans and hunter-gatherers in Botswana. The gene variants were present in humanity’s distant ancestors, even before our species evolved in Africa 300,000 years ago. Amazing.

President Trump asked if he could increase the nuclear stockpile – NBC

TheU.S.TV network NBC had an exclusive report about Donald Trump asking to increase the nuclear weapons stockpile.
The network reported on Wednesday that Trump told his national security team that he wanted a tenfold increase in the arsenal a request that left military officials flabbergasted.
The request also led Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to brand the president a “moron.
In July, Trump said he wanted to expand the nation’s nuclear capabilities after seeing data showing the stockpile dwindling over the past 50 years, according to the report. Trump didn’t take too kindly to the report
“Fake @NBCNews made up a story that I wanted a “tenfold” increase in our U.S. nuclear arsenal. Pure fiction, made up to demean. NBC = CNN! he tweeted.

This glue helps people in seconds

How does this sound. You have a bleading cut but all you have is glue.
What you did in the past was glue it together then go to the hospital for the real medical care – that is the internet roomers anyway. I have never done it. But, what if you didn’t need the stitches?
Australian and American biomedical engineers have developed a stretchy surgical glue that rapidly heals wounds, a “breakthrough” that has the potential to save lives in emergencies, its designers say, reports the new york post.
The glue is called MeTro and it is based on a naturally occurring protein called tropaelastin.
The way it will work: It is applied directly to the wound and is then activated with UV light to form a complete seal, eliminating the need for staples or stitches. Its elasticity means it’s designed to work well on shape-changing internal organs like the lungs and heart reports the New York Post.
This is cool: A study published in journal Science Translational Medicine showed the glue quickly and successfully sealed incisions in the arteries and lungs of rodents and the lungs of pigs.
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3 people win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution.

Three people have received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry which was awarded for Cryo-Electron Microscopy.
Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson received the Nobel prise in chemistry for their work on cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution. Like you I am going what?
The New York Times describes it like this:”Cryo-electron microscopy makes it possible to portray biomolecules after freezing them very quickly so their natural shape is preserved, the Nobel committee said, in summarizing the work of Mr. Dubochet, of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Mr. Frank, of Columbia University; and Mr. Henderson of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, in Cambridge, England.
The method simplifies and improves the imaging of biomolecules, the committee said in a statement, and has moved biochemistry into a new era. So, why does this matter?
Apparently what these men did they founded a method that allows all protein molecules of life to be seen.
“Now we can see the intricate details of the biomolecules in every corner of our cells, in every drop of our body fluids. We are facing a revolution in biochemistry,” Sara Snogerup Linse, a professor of physical chemistry at Lund University in Sweden, said, reports the New York Times.
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CPR is on the rise thanks to public health initiatives

Health initiatives that are aimed toward the public in using CPR and defibrillation are working.
The UPI has this to say: Nearly 400,000 Americans have out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, or OHCA, annually, but less than 10 percent survive to hospital discharge. Up to 80 percent of all OHCAs happen in the home and people who have an at-home OHCA have a four to five times lower chance of survival compared to individuals who have an OHCA in public locations. The numbers are powerful.
“Researchers studied 8,269 patients with OHCAs, 68 percent occurred at home and 32 percent occurred in public, were resuscitation was attempted using the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival database from January 2010 to December 2014 in 16 counties in North Carolina. The study, published today in JAMA Cardiology, found that after the public health initiative, the number of patients receiving bystander CPR at home increased from 28 percent to 41 percent, and from 61 percent to 71 percent in public. First-responder defibrillation increased at home form 42 percent to 51 percent, however, in public it only increased from 33 percent to 38 percent.”
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for there work on decisive contributions in the observation of gravitational waves 3 people win the nobel physics prise.

The Nobel prises are being handed out. The question is who will win what? We have the answer for physics this year.
For their work on decisive contributions in the observation of gravitational waves Scientists Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne won the 2017 Nobel Prize for Physics.
“This is something completely new and different, opening up unseen worlds,” the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement on awarding the 9 million Swedish crown ($1.1 million) prize.
“A wealth of discoveries awaits those who succeed in capturing the waves and interpreting their message. Apparently these three men prooved a theory by Albert Einstein a century ago. The New York Times tells us how they got the award.
“In February 2016, when an international collaboration of physicists and astronomers announced that they had recorded gravitational waves emanating from the collision of a pair of massive black holes a billion light years away, it mesmerized the world. The work validated Einstein’s longstanding prediction that space-time can shake like a bowlful of jelly when massive objects swing their weight around, and it has put astronomers on intimate terms with the deepest levels of physical reality, of a void booming and rocking with invisible cataclysms, the times writes.
The Times goes on to expand upon the theory of relativity writing:”Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity , pronounced in 1916, suggested that matter and energy would warp the geometry of space-time the way a heavy sleeper sags a mattress, producing the effect we call gravity. His equations described a universe in which space and time were dynamic. Space-time could stretch and expand, tear and collapse into black holes objects so dense that not even light could escape them. The equations predicted, somewhat to his displeasure, that the universe was expanding from what we now call the Big Bang, and it also predicted that the motions of massive objects like black holes or other dense remnants of dead stars would ripple space-time with gravitational waves. .

These waves would stretch and compress space in orthogonal directions as they went by, the same way that sound waves compress air. They had never been directly seen” until they used lazers to mesure the distence between two mirrors.