breakfast-menu

For breakfast I had waffles with maple sirup, and coffee.
What did you have?

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meditation: what not to call it according to A.O. Scott of the New York Times

Readers note: This is a meditation. Whatever, comes out of my brain will land on the screen. We don’t follow logic here.
End readers note. A. O. Scott of the New York Times wrote on Tuesday a small section on an article all about how he cooks during Thanksgiving because he feels he shouldn’t do what he does every day – critique people on their art – on that day. Food is an artform. Getting the textures just right is akin to mixing paint – although this art you can eat and it wont make you odd.
However, I am not going to talk about how food is an artform anymore. Or maybe I will. Although that would be quite fun. Instead i am going to quote him and then ponder about the words.
“The ugliest phrase in the English language, as far as I’m concerned, is “pot-luck supper,” especially if you style the first word without the hyphen. It’s phonetically hideous, and even though the experience may offer some alluring flavors, it will lack both coherence and a singular target for credit or blame. A simple phrase. Only 51 words. However, they are true.
Let me share them again. “The ugliest phrase in the English language, as far as I’m concerned, is “pot-luck supper,” especially if you style the first word without the hyphen. It’s phonetically hideous, and even though the experience may offer some alluring flavors, it will lack both coherence and a singular target for credit or blame.”
While I agree that the phrase “Pot luck supper” is ugly because it looks odd as all get out and yes the word should be spelled pot-luck supper, I must disagree with the last line.
.. “even though the experience may offer some alluring flavors, it will lack both coherence and a singular target for credit or blame,” is true but this day is all about avoiding blame. Mostly this day is about avoiding drama tbh. I like pot-lucks because they show the cooking skills of those who come to the party. Yes, if you atend a pot-luck with me you will bring something. Even a store bought box of donuts will do. Who doesn’t like a donut? Those with no soal! Duh!

Anyone want some Dessert hummus?

Hi guys. Yes you read that right Dessert hummus is now a thing. We can thank Sharktank for that. Start reacting how you will.
This is an idea that Mark Cuban enjoyed (who is bankroling the operation) mr. Cuban who owns the Dallas Mavericks, bought in for $600,000 and holds a 12 percent share in the venture.
“The health-conscious company makes hummus spreads in flavors such as snickerdoodle, brownie batter, vanilla, and “choc-o-mint,” already available in grocery stores nationwide.

The sweet spread starts with puréed chickpeas, but omits the garlic and olive oil used in traditional hummus, substituting ingredients such as cocoa, vanilla and mint instead. The dessert hummus has 4 to 6 grams of sugar per two-tablespoon serving” (new york post, 2017.) What do you think?

What is palak chaat? Let me meditate on this.

I have never herd of palak chaat before. It sounds like something that you would find on Chopped. Palak chaat is a saucy, complex heap of crispy fried spinach, according to the Washington Post. Also according to the post it is an Indian meal. However, without Googling it I truely cannot say. So, let me Google it. Apparently Chaat is a type of snack think of street food in India.
According to the Oxferd English Dictionary Chaat is “an Indian dish of boiled vegetables or raw fruit, with spices.” According to the dictionary Palak is spinach. So, Palak Chaat is a snack with spinach in it along with spices.

I read in the times about Valpolicella and its brother Amarone della Valpolicella – this is what I learned

Wine is not my favorite thing to drink. In fact I would rather have a beer than a glas of fermented grape juce. However, while the taste of wine isn’t my drink of choice their is something to be said about the names of them. One such name is Valpolicella – a wine that is made in Italy.
Perhaps I am a daft nitwit but doesn’t just saying Valpolicella tingle your tung? It makes you want to drink some or in my case smile. So, I will let you say it five more times. Valpolicella, Valpolicella, Valpolicella, Valpolicella, Valpolicella. As Tony Cenicola wrote in the times:
“Valpolicella seems to have fallen off the face of the earth.

Not literally, of course. The vines are still growing there in the Veneto region of northeastern Italy, and the bottles are still being filled and shipped. Yet this once ubiquitous wine now seems kind of absent.

Back in the 1970s and ’80s, even American children knew of Valpolicella. That unnerves me. Children shouldn’t know of such things.
Yet they did.
“Commercials for one of the biggest brands, Bolla , played regularly on radio and television, and the euphony of the phrase was as catchy as Orson Welles declaring that Paul Masson would sell no wine before its time” (nyt, 2017.)
Apparently, Valpolicella has a younger brother and frankly I love the name even more! Try and not smile after saying this: Amarone della Valpolicella.
According to the times Amarone della Valpolicella is fancy. No really? Just look at the name! Amarone della Valpolicella!
That just ooses fancy. The times tells us about Valpolicella and Amarone della Valpolicella since the 1980s writing:”Both wines originate in the same region of the Veneto, north of Verona, and are made from the same grapes: primarily corvina, with some rondinella and corvinone. Molinara and a few other grapes are also permitted in smaller quantities. .

The production of Amarone, as is evident by the formal name, is interwoven with Valpolicella. Traditionally, a small percentage of grapes in the region are dried after harvest until they became sweet and concentrated. They are then fermented into a sweet wine, Recioto della Valpolicella. The concentration of sugar in the dried grapes produces high alcohol levels in which yeast cannot survive generally dying before fermentation is complete leaving a sweet, unctuous wine.

Occasionally, though, the Recioto ferments until it is dry. This is Amarone, a powerful wine with alcohol levels that can surpass 16 percent. Dang!
16% sounds like you only need a glas to end your night.
Don’t open Recioto della Valpolicella while you watch scandle tonight. You’ll forget what happened.

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